Tag Archives: bobby cherry

My 2021 Sheetz cold brew coffee count is ‘for the Kidz’

Back by nobody’s demand!

As the year winds down, I’m counting up the number of Sheetz cold brew coffees I’ve had in 2021! And, this year, I’m supporting Sheetz For the Kidz with this crazy cold brew coffee addiction.

As you might know, I’m slightly addicted to cold brew coffee from Sheetz. (If you don’t know, now you do.)

What began as a joke in 2020 from some people wondering how many Sheetz cold brew coffees I had during the year turned into a fun guessing game! Sheetz makes it easy to keep track in the MySheetz app.

The winner for my 2020 count was Sheetz worker Ashley who likely made a majority of those cold brew coffees.

So, let’s do it again for 2021.

Drop a guess under my tweet or Instagram post before the Times Square ball drops on Dec. 31.

That’s it! I’ll pull the guesses together and see who’s the closest.

I’ll share the actual total — and winner! — on Jan. 1!

As a bonus this year: For every cold brew coffee I had in 2021, I am going to donate $1 to the Sheetz For the Kidz nonprofit group that helps support children and their families in need in Sheetz communities.

The Sheetz employee-driven charity focuses on three areas: Gifts, wishes and food. Sheetz For the Kidz supports an annual holiday gift-giving program for children, Make-A-Wish Foundation and Feeding America.

Sheetz For the Kidz dates to 1992 when two Sheetz district managers raised $12,000 and took 126 children shopping for the holidays, according to its website. Today, the nonprofit organization supports 9,700 kids every year.

You can support Sheetz For the Kidz by making a donation here, using MySheetz rewards points to make a donation, buying Sheetz For the Kidz charity water and checking Sheetz stores for in-store efforts in July and December.

Need a hint for making a guess?

  • I offered a tip last year sharing how many cold brew coffees I had through the end of September. Not doing that this year! I have to make it a little more difficult. But here’s a tip to maybe help you get in the ballpark: In September, I had 35. In July, I had 40. Were other months higher, lower or about the same? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 

Quick rules and other things:

  • We’ll follow “The Price Is Right” method: The winner whose guess is closest without going over wins. (So, if you live under a rock: If the correct answer is 5 and you guess 6, you lost.)
  • There’s no prize for winning other than the satisfaction of making a lucky guess.
  • In the event of a tie, those with the correct answer will all be considered winners!
  • Post your guess to the above mentioned social media posts by 11:59:59 Dec. 31.
  • Disclaimer: Adding this disclaimer so you know that Sheetz is in no way connected to this, they didn’t ask me to do this, they’re not overseeing it, they’re going to find out at the same time you do when reading this. I’m just a crazy Sheetz Freak who loves Sheetz.

31things: Favorite year-end donations/charities

Inspired by my attempt last December and from my friend Stephanie, I’m going to try blogging each day in December — holiday themes, of course! I’m calling it “31things.” Click here for more details. Read below for today’s post.

If you know me, you know this answer is pretty easy! Though, over the past several years, I’ve added another charity to year-end thoughts.

I spend much of my life volunteering with the American Cancer Society, as you might know. So it goes without saying that I hope everybody can find a few dollars to offer toward patient services and research because too many people and their families are suffering from the effects of cancer.

But, I’ve added the Toys for Tots program to my list of nonprofits I think of at this time of year. Thanks to my good pals Mike and Bob at Pittsburgh’s 96.1 Kiss FM, I’ve realized something I’ve always known — every kid deserves a gift at Christmas.

The economy sucks, it really doesn’t seem to be getting better and more people are suffering. Lost in that shuffle are kids, whose parents are doing everything they can just to pay for food and rent. Mike and Bob and the fine folks at Clear Channel Pittsburgh have, for eight years now, hosted Stuff-A-Bus — a weeklong event geared at raising awareness, money and donations for the Pittsburgh area Marines Toys for Tots program.

Their efforts prompted me to write a story last year for the Trib’s community newspapers and to suggest that for this December, my newspaper, the Sewickley Herald, take on the Beaver County Toys for Tots program for our annual holiday project. The Beaver County chapter does not reap the benefits of the 96.1 FM Stuff-A-Bus event.

Please read my story and consider donating to the Beaver County Toys for Tots or your local chapter because no child should wonder why Santa skipped their house.

Why journalists should build personal brands, and why those who disagree also are correct

Get ready for a tailspin of a ride regarding the personal “branding” of journalists.

The Internet — more specifically, Facebook — has been abuzz with reporters and television folks, freelancers, photographers and bloggers all creating their own Facebook pages after the social media-focused company created its Facebook + Journalists network.

It wasn’t until Facebook began connecting reporters across the globe that I realized branding is important on a personal level. We have no idea where our industry is headed, and for those of us employed by news companies, we never know what tomorrow brings. So we work and do our job and hope that we’re able to come in the next morning and pick up where we left off the night before.

This past week, for instance, we saw Gannett announce layoffs of some 700 employees companywide and implement mandatory 15-day furloughs for executives whose salary figures are above a certain number. We see newspapers closing, television newsrooms shrinking and more bloggers willing to work for free to produce work even a middle school journalism enthusiast would do a better job covering.

But it’s all part of an industry in a never-ending fluctuation.

So what’s a journalist to do? Market themselves.

We learn at a very young age to market ourself in a way that makes us stand out among the crowd. Resumes and cover letters are supposed to make hiring managers and editors stop in their tracks as a potential job seeker highlights his previous experience.

It’s not about embellishing, but rather, about the ability to showcase your skills in a manner that proves you’re capable of the challenges that could be ahead.

So when I created my Facebook + Journalist page, I took into consideration not just my reporting ability, but other media-focused things I’m interested in. I also considered my human interest side.

The outcome is a brand that showcases my reporting skills, writing abilities, volunteer work and a softer side that includes my passion for a certain long-running television series and my love of all things Pittsburgh.

The page isn’t branded as “Bobby Cherry — Trib Total Media,” but rather as “Bobby Cherry, a reporter with many skills and interests.” That’s not to say readers haven’t “liked” the page. A few have, and I want more to as well. I want them to be able to interact with me and get to know me in a capacity that doesn’t say, “Yo man, let’s go drink,” but instead says, “I’m your local reporter. Tell me what’s happening.”

We are in a different world now than 10, 20, 30 years ago. While I can’t speak first-hand about what reporting was like before cable TV and the Internet, I am led to believe that, at the bottom of it all, journalism hasn’t changed over time. The way in which news is consumed has changed, though.

So when I read things that question why journalists are branding themselves, I can’t help but wonder how those folks think people will receive the news in 20 years.

Take, for instance, Gene Weingarten’s column in Thursday’s Washington Post, whose column was written to a graduate student asking how he has branded himself over the length of his career. He replied by saying that branding is ruining journalism.

These are financially troubled times for our profession, Leslie — times that test our character — and it is disheartening to learn that journalism schools are responding to this challenge by urging their students to market themselves like Cheez Doodles. — Gene Weingarten

While I wish Mr. Weingarten would have spoken more about how branding is ruining journalism (I’d enjoy hearing more about his thoughts), I did agree with his comments on how newspaper companies think user-generated content is necessary.

Newspapers that used to allocate their resources to deposing dictators and ferreting out corruption are now using them to publish snapshots of their readers’ cats. This trend is called “user generated content,” or UGC. (Yes, in the new lexicon, “readers” have somehow become “users,” as though, in an effort to habituate people to our product, we’re lacing it with crack. Which we are, sort of. Pandering, and getting pandered to, can be addictive, and it is bad for you.) …

Newspapers used to give readers what we thought they needed. Now, in desperation, we give readers what we think they want. And what we seem to think they want is happy, glitzy, ditzy stuff, which is why in recent years newspapers across the country have been replacing sections named, say, “Viewpoint” with online Web destinations named, say, “Wheee!” featuring multiplatform, user-interactive content-sharing with clickable portals to “Lolcats.” — Gene Weingarten

He’s right. News companies have focused more on poking the reader for their thoughts and less on making the reader the audience. The readers do everything except sit in the newsroom with us. Every story seems to end by saying, “What do you think about the sky being blue? We want to hear from you!”

There’s nothing wrong with asking readers for feedback. In many ways, newspapers ALWAYS have relied on reader content — news tips, submitted photos, letters to the editor, community briefs, school accolades. But we’re at a point where we seem to want user content more than our own, unique content.

So I understand why Mr. Weingarten seems frustrated.

But I don’t understand his correlation between a personal brand and implementing more reader content.

Whether in a formal or informal way, newspapers always have branded themselves as the town’s focal point for news, views and information. So it comes as no surprise that now, as newspapers struggle to survive financially and struggle to compete with other venues, reporters are creating personal brands.

I want people to read my content. I want them to see what’s happening in their town. Journalism always has been about marketing one’s self. If we write a story and tell nobody about it, then what the hell was the purpose of writing it?

We’ve got to make a name for ourself, and for our newspaper. If a reader enjoys what I’m writing, they’re (hopefully) more likely to see what other stories and work our newspaper features.

Where I struggle to support a reporter’s personal branding is when the individual wants to share information and photos of their cat or their grocery cart filled with food. I’ve found many reporter Facebook pages that are filled with more content showcasing the individual at charity events or outside of the news world, rather than content relating to news.

While readers might be interested in seeing photos of our animals, I question the professionalism of such information. If you’re writing a column about a trip to a dog park and you add a photo of your pup, that’s one thing. But when you’ve uploaded a photo of your dog sleeping with a caption that says, “Rover is tired,” I really have to question it.

It’s about giving the reader what they don’t know they need.

And in today’s world where a century old newspaper is competing with a blog created yesterday, we — the reporters of the world — need to prove to people why our work, backed by intelligent editors who are passionate about journalism, can offer better content than a fly-by-night blogger.

So if that means branding my work and letting potential readers get to know me on a level beyond my byline, I’m OK with it.