Category Archives: media

‘Major fan girl’ admits to plagiarizing

Elliott Shaffner was fired from the Richmond Times-Dispatch this week after it was discovered the now former food critic plagiarized, Poynter reports.

Did I have malicious intent? No. Did I even recognize what I was doing was plagiarism? I did not. – Elliott Shaffner

Huh? How does one not recognize they are stealing someone else’s work?

Holiday TV: Dec. 1

Looking for festive holiday shows tonight? ABC Family kicks off its 25 Days of Christmas today!

Here’s some of what’s on TV tonight:

6 p.m. — “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation,” ABC Family

8 p.m. — “CMA Country Christmas,” ABC; Elf,” ABC Family; “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York,” AMC

9 p.m. — “Greatest Holiday Commercials Countdown,” The CW

10 p.m. — “The Santa Clause,” ABC Family

Looking for more holiday shows? Check this previous post for some great links.

Find holiday TV shows

From classic animated shows to new movies, take a peek at some of the websites I’ve found to help you find holiday-themed programming.

  • WPXI-TV’s Scott Harbaugh’s Christmas TV viewing guide: A Pittsburgh TV meteorologist, Scott’s love of Christmas is shared with friends and viewers through his TV guide detailing some of the more popular and classic shows available.
  • Christmas TV Schedule: This website seems to have a thorough list of movies and shows.
  • MostlyChristmas.com: This site is good, but difficult to navigate. The link starts on Nov. 28 because you have to click through each page. So if it’s later in the year when you find this, jump several numbers ahead.

Have some to share? Let me know!

Remembering Edith Hughes…

Unlike many colleagues and friends, my stories of Edith Hughes don’t involve what seemed to be a haphazard interview session or a layout filled with red ink corrections.

My first run-in with Edith came one morning in 2007 in the Gateway Newspapers former office on Greentree Road. It was early that morning — just myself and Signal Item editor Bob Pastin were in. Edith quickly zipped through the office, pausing just enough to look at me — a new face. She rushed into Bob’s cubicle and asked, “Who is that?”

Bob replied, explaining I was the new (at the time) part-time reporter for the Signal Item and Sewickley Herald. She came back out of his cubicle, looked at me as I awkwardly smiled at her — unsure of what just took place, and then she left.

The first time I spoke to Edith was in Harrisburg for a Pennsylvania Newspaper Association weeklies conference. Her first statement: “Did you get breakfast?” No, I said. She then looked me up and down and asked how I was liking the Sewickley Herald. Before I could finish a sentence, she said, “Interesting attire, young man.” I had on khakis, a polo shirt and tennis shoes — my usual work attire.

She then said, “Maybe you’ll learn something here to take back to Sewickley.”

What she didn’t know is that it wasn’t the guest speakers from The Patriot-News or any other newspaper that I’d learn from that day. It was Edith who would teach me more than I ever thought I could know.

You see, Edith had a way with more than just journalism. She had a way with life. In her eyes, good manners, proper attire and fine detail meant everything. You didn’t cut corners. You gave more than your best. And you did all of that out of respect for yourself, your talent and your colleagues.

I got to know her more through stories from colleagues and from her random visits to the Sewickley Herald office. She played a major role in the Herald’s annual honors dinner, recognizing the great community-minded individuals of the year. Place cards were handwritten, not typed. The menu offered nothing but the best food. And the entire evening was as perfect as perfect could be. Why? Because she’d settle for nothing less.

At one of the honors dinners, she looked at me and said, “You clean up well. I almost didn’t recognize you.”

In January of this year, I returned from a nearly two-week-long vacation. I had a missed call and e-mail from Edith. Odd, I thought. Out of the more than 20 voice mails and 200 e-mails, Edith’s were the first messages I responded to.

Days later, I heard from her. She wanted to talk to me in person. I was nervous, to say the least. She couldn’t fire me, she didn’t have that authority anymore. Right? But what did I do to be getting a visit exclusively from Edith?

I dressed a tad nicer than my average wardrobe (no tie, though), and awaited her visit. Snowflakes were flying. Edith called and said she’d be late. Finally, Edith arrived and whisked me away into the conference room where she shut the door.

“I need you to talk at the weeklies seminar about everything you do with technology,” she said. “It’s in April.”

This was early January — many months and inches of snow away from April.

“Yeah, I’ll do it,” I nervously said, scribbling down the words “April” and “PNA.”

“Yes, you’ll do it,” Edith said, either repeating what I said, but probably correcting my language.

She expected an outline by mid-February. I e-mailed her an outline by the end of that week in January.

The morning of the conference, Edith — oddly enough — was late. As it turned out, the massive rain and flooding from the previous day and night knocked the power out at her hotel. I stayed elsewhere in the Harrisburg area, which was unheard of in Edith’s mind because I did not get breakfast options at my hotel (though, she was impressed that I got a better room rate than she!).

Right before my turn to present, I completely re-did my entire presentation because the previous speakers took most of what I was going to say. Introducing me to the crowd, Edith explained what a dedicated and passionate reporter I was, and what I had done to help make the Sewickley Herald a newsier paper. I can remember standing there thinking, “Holy crap, Edith is saying this about me?”

Afterward, Edith told me I was the best presenter (even though I went over by 15 minutes). “That was some talk you gave” she said. “Even I was surprised. You knocked their socks off.”  She paused and said, “You’re already booked for next year.” I didn’t get a chance to agree because she grabbed a mint and walked away.

I wasn’t hired by her or even worked under her, but I still felt I needed her approval as a journalist. And I’m pretty sure I got it that day.

She didn’t make the Herald’s honors dinner this year because she was traveling. But I did sit next to her in May at the Keystone Press Awards, where she, again, spoke highly of my presentation a month earlier. At the Keystone Press Awards dinner, we talked about my presentation for next April and how she thought the awards dinner chicken was too dry and the speakers were mostly boring.

She, no doubt, has made a lasting impact on my career — and more importantly, my life. Thanks to Edith, I hold myself in higher regard and respect the decisions I make and the stories I cover, knowing that my name is on whatever story I’m writing at the moment, so it better be the best it can be.

“Reporters are a dime a dozen,” she once told me. That phrase has stuck with me, allowing me to remember what my job is and to carry it out with dignity and respect.

Edith made me realize just how important grammar and proper communication skills are, and to be poignant, sharp and decisive.

My world is a better place thanks to Edith.

Google+ doesn’t have me saying buh-bye to Facebook

Move over Facebook, the Internet is getting crowded with places for people to share stuff.

The recent addition of Google+ (pronounced: Google plus), has caused a big stir among social networking usage.

I’ve read blog posts from folks claiming they’re ditching Facebook, to others who refuse to sign up for Google’s version of a social network.

This new wave of shifting our focus to other social networking sites reminds me of our country’s suburban sprawl movement. There was a time when folks worked, lived, played in one city. They rarely left because it offered everything they needed. But as transportation expanded, so too did the need for people to move up and out.

One by one, they built homes in areas once filled with trees and farms. Stores, workplaces and schools were added so these folks wouldn’t need to leave the confines of their suburbs — away from the dirt and grime of city living.

Changes in social networking, in some way, mimic that of our suburban expansion. Facebook was, at one time, generally the only option available. It has offered an expansive array of tools, and keeps the largest number of folks always connected.

While its population isn’t currently threatened by Google+, there have been many folks looking to ditch the all-inclusive Facebook for its slimmed down, sleeker nemesis.

Similar to why I question how somebody could live hours away from civilization, I wonder what is leading some folks to do an about face on Facebook?

Part of being social is connecting with a mass audience. You can’t do that on Google+.

Several friends of mine who are early adopters of Google+ seem ready to deactivate their Facebook accounts for a land of few connections.

Some claim it is because Google+ offers none of the add-ons of Facebook — games and a barrage of applications. Google+ is so new that it isn’t being forced to redefine itself and create an online world to appease millions of users. Yet.

In the early days of Facebook, you could update what you were doing and add photos. As user numbers grew, so, too, did the options available. It’s part of Facebook’s effort to keep people coming back.

Facebook has been very smart at adding to its network unlike its former competitor MySpace.

For Google+ to thrive and survive, it must meet the requirements of its users. I’m sure there will be a time in the not so distant future when Google is forced to look at what has made Facebook continue its domination and repeat that.

Already, some question if the name (Google+) will work. Its few social add-ons (hanging out, circles, etc) seem to be weak and cumbersome in design and user friendliness. And similar to Facebook, Google+ will drop much of its limited profile security later this summer.

Folks who claim they’re ready to jump off Facebook are doing themselves a disservice and are not looking at the broader picture. Facebook has proved it has staying power. It will survive and continue to thrive. Why would anybody who calls themselves a social media enthusiast not want to remain with a brand that has paved the way for others and changed so much of how we live?

Google+ has a chance, but like its predecessors, will go through a lot of pain. Can it survive? Who knows? We’ve seen Google fail miserably before (hello, Google Wave).